Sunday, 22 February 2009

They

were

terrors

during

upload.



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  • John Williams
  • John Lamont
  • John Bass
  • John Charteris
  • John Warman
  • John Richardson
  • John Howard
  • John Porter
  • John Youles
  • John Beirne
  • Dr John Gilbert
  • John Ramirez
  • John Richling
  • John Randall
  • John Clarke
  • John Peacock
  • John Oswald
  • John Palfreyman
  • Dr John Alderdice
  • John Heppell
  • John Lennox
  • John Hughes
  • John Moffat
  • John Dominic Battle
  • John Adams
  • Dr John Campbell
  • John Barnes
  • John R Rathbone
  • John Shaw
  • John Robertson
  • John McCready
  • John Hoodless
  • John Taylor
  • John Wilkinson
  • John Hutton
  • John Bufton
  • John Morgan
  • John Bissett
  • John Williams
  • Sir John Butterfill
  • John Wilton
  • John Nicholson
  • John Evans
  • John Taylor
  • John Weller
  • John Murphy
  • John Wilson
  • John MacDougall
  • John Pugh
  • John Allen
  • John Hemming-Clark
  • John MacGregor
  • John Harrison
  • John Commons
  • Sir John Hunt
  • John Matthews
  • John Browne
  • John Burnett
  • John Davies
  • John Ross
  • John McKerchar
  • John Houston
  • John Cummings
  • John Vincent
  • John Kelly
  • John Hobbs
  • John Whittingdale
  • John Connon
  • John Fagan
  • John Bigger
  • John Airey
  • John Baker
  • John Cartwright
  • John Laker
  • John Moore
  • John Mann
  • John Butcher
  • John Drummond Moray
  • John McLeod
  • John Croft
  • John Barrett
  • John Oswald
  • John Felgate
  • John Redfern
  • John Bates
  • John Martin
  • John Grogan
  • John Pletts
  • John Backhouse
  • John Knight
  • John Spottiswoode
  • John Robinson
  • John Humberstone
  • Mrs L St John Howe
  • John Carlisle
  • John Wilkinson
  • John Marsh
  • John Harthman
  • John Taylor
  • John Howlett

Find your MP


Cardinal eighty-eight
Ordinal 88th
(eighty-eighth)
Numeral system 88
Factorization  2^3 \cdot 11
Divisors 1, 2, 4, 8, 11, 22, 44, 88
Roman numeral LXXXVIII
Binary 10110002
Octal 1308
Duodecimal 7412
Hexadecimal 5816
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888
88888888888888888888888

KANTST

The faculty of knowledge from a priori principles may cause
The faculty of knowledge from a priori principles may cause
The faculty of knowledge from a priori principles may cause
The faculty of knowledge from a priori principles may cause
The faculty of knowledge from a priori principles may cause


The faculty of knowledge from 
a priori principles may cause
definable form











http://www.rightmove.co.uk/
* JOIN
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7 January 1947 (USA)

Sample from Vinespace

Thespace is pleased to present new work by the artist Alex Artist. This exhibition features a series of linked pieces or ‘chapters’ that are partly autobiographical and partly reference the classic film 'Classic film’.

'Classic Film’s uplifting, impressionable fable asks a simple question: "What would this world be like if I had never been born?" It is a gloriously appealing film that treads an uneven path between the sentimental and the profound as the protagonist, George Actor (played by James Person) learns to recognize that he makes a significant difference to those around him. He is an optimistic analogy (or a pessimistic wake-up call) for the way we live our lives in the real world.

This work is a visual exploration of the reciprocal exchange between the film and the manner in which its message is embedded in Artist’s own psyche. How the concept of the protagonist extends beyond fiction and into the real world; how we are all protagonists in the narratives of our own lives. It is no coincidence that ‘Classic film’ is so meaningful at a time when the structural and moral integrity of Capitalism is being questioned and ‘relationships of self interest’ are in the dock. Artist has made this work within a complex framework of self analysis, shared cultural knowledge and global insecurity.

Friday, 20 February 2009

J'avais l'habitude d'ordonner le monde Les mers se lèveraient quand j'ai donné le mot Maintenant le matin je seul dors Balayez les rues que j'ai utilisées au propre J'avais l'habitude de rouler les matrices Sentez la crainte dans mon enemy' ; yeux de s Écoutez car la foule chanterait " ; Maintenant le vieux roi est mort ! Vivent longtemps le roi ! " ; Une minute j'ai tenu la clef Après les murs étaient fermés sur moi Et j'ai découvert que mes châteaux se tiennent Sur des piliers de sel et des piliers du sable J'entends des cloches de Jérusalem une sonnerie Les choeurs romains de cavalerie chantent Soyez mon miroir, mon épée et bouclier Mes missionnaires dans un domaine étranger Pour quelque raison je can' ; t expliquent Une fois que vous allez il n'y avait jamais Jamais un mot honnête Et c'était quand j'ai ordonné le monde C'était le vent mauvais et sauvage A soufflé en bas des portes pour me laisser dedans Fenêtres brisées et le bruit des tambours Les gens couldn' ; t croient quel I' ; d deviennent Attente de révolutionnaires Pour ma tête d'un plat argenté Juste une marionnette sur une corde isolée Oh qui voudrait jamais être roi ? J'entends des cloches de Jérusalem une sonnerie Les choeurs romains de cavalerie chantent Soyez mon miroir, mon épée et bouclier Mes missionnaires dans un domaine étranger Pour quelque raison je can' ; t expliquent Je connais le saint Peter won' ; appel de t mon nom Jamais un mot honnête Mais c'était quand j'ai ordonné le monde J'entends des cloches de Jérusalem une sonnerie Les choeurs romains de cavalerie chantent Soyez mon miroir, mon épée et bouclier Mes missionnaires dans un domaine étranger Pour quelque raison je can' ; t expliquent Je connais le saint Peter won' ; appel de t mon nom Jamais un mot honnête Mais c'était quand j'ai ordonné le monde


Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal: But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other; or else he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You can not serve both God and Mammon.

کتاب الآثار الباقية عن القرون الخالية ‎

Not suggested

It is the only
brand of clothing
I have worn
consistently throughout
my life

That word “patina” is another reason, I’m sure, we all respond to Welsh dressers. It’s the lovely combination of dirt, smoke and beeswax, worked into the wood over two hundred years or more, that creates the warmth and color we all search for in a piece of oak. It makes us feel good. It’s not comfort food; it’s comfort furniture.

But why do we call them ‘Welsh’ dressers, even if the piece of furniture was made in Yorkshire or Shropshire? Dressers were made all over England, Scotland and Wales from the late seventeenth through the nineteenth century. But the term dresser has become synonymous with Wales, probably because of the large number of high quality examples that have come out of there.

Welsh craftsmen were known for their skill and individuality, and dressers from Wales tend to have an abundance of decoration and added features like scalloped cornices and pierced aprons, while English dressers are, as a rule, plainer.

No matter where they were made, no two dressers are ever alike. Inevitably there will be variations in decoration on the top cornice, the arrangement of drawers and cupboards, and the style of legs.

Dressers were made with whatever wood was at hand - pine, elm, or fruitwood, but most are oak. It was easy to split, stood up to wear and tear, and had a beautiful grain and color.

In 1962, Hermann Nitsch locked himself in a basement with two assistants. He crucified a lamb, then proceeded to stage his own crucifixion while one assistant poured animal blood over him, staining the background sheet to produce a "relic." But this wasn't a cultic ritual, this was an exhibition called Blood Organ, and it was just the precursor to performances which have reached festival proportions. His Das Orgien Mysterien Theater is a full-on bacchanalia of music, blood, wine and drama with all senses operating at once. Raw flesh meets naked revelers as Nitsch sprays blood over the audience, implicating them in the deaths of the bulls, sheep, pigs and other animals, and aiming to damn the mechanisms of repression in our affluent society. As he explains:

"A psychoanalytically-oriented dramaturgy allows the Dionysian to burst forth from within us. Suppressed areas of inner impulses are made visible. The actions with flesh, blood and slaughtered animals plumb the collective areas of our unconscious minds. The paramount aim and purpose of the festival is a profound affirmation of our existence, our life and our creation. The mysticism of being leads to a permanent festival of life."

In general, archives of any individual or
organization consist of records which
have been especially selected for
permanent or long-term preservation,
due to their enduring research value.
Archival records are normally
unpublished and almost always unique,
unlike books or magazines, in which
many identical copies exist.

A, six hidden

to capture
the texture for use

To capture the texture
of use

To rupture the texture of the use

Turner, turned

«Lecteur, si je faisais ici une pause, et que je reprisse l'histoire de l'homme à une seule chemise, parce qu'il n'avait qu'un corps à la fois, je voudrais bien savoir ce que vous en penseriez? Que je me suis fourré dans une "impasse" à la Voltaire, ou vulgairement dans un cul-de-sac, d'où je ne sais comment sortir.»

"Reader, if I have put a pause here, and that I continued the story of the man with a lone shirt, because he had only one body at any one time, I would like to know what you would think? That I lost myself in an "impasse" à la Voltaire, or vulgarly a cul-de-sac, from which I don't know how to leave."

cul-de-sac


Wednesday, 18 February 2009

In the 17th and 18th centuries, it was common in England to use the verb 'Welsh' to imply thievery or dishonesty – to 'Welsh' on a deal – or the adjective 'Welsh' to mean inferior quality or an outright counterfeit.

Sunday, 15 February 2009

There are many wonderful things, but none is more wonderful than man.
I know that I shall meet my fate
Somewhere among the clouds above;
Those that I fight I do not hate,
Those that I guard I do not love;
My county is Kiltartan Cross,
My countrymen Kiltartan's poor,
No likely end could bring them loss
Or leave them happier than before.
Nor law, nor duty bade me fight,
Nor public men, nor cheering crowds,
A lonely impulse of delight
Drove to this tumult in the clouds;
I balanced all, brought all to mind,
The years to come seemed waste of breath,
A waste of breath the years behind
In balance with this life, this death.

Saturday, 14 February 2009

On the occasion of Maria Lassnig's 90th birthday, Vienna’s MUMOK hosts a major solo exhibition of her work. Approximately 100 paintings and drawings will be on display, focussing on her output from the last 10 years.The exhibition coincides with a further presentation of Lassnig's work at the Museum Ludwig in Cologne, ‘Maria Lassnig: Inside Out’ (14 March – 16 June 2009), which features a selection of works that date from the late 1940s.



colateral

FRANCIS bacon
francis BACON
1909-1992
1561-1626

Woodhouse

Golf... is the infallible test. The man who can go into a patch of rough alone, with the knowledge that only God is watching him, and play his ball where it lies, is the man who will serve you faithfully and well.
Welcome to a world of art. Art is such a wonderful thing. Each person sees it and feels it differently. There's no right or wrong, there's no true or false. What one person may see as a mess is an intricate beauty to another. Art is freedom of expression, art is an unleashing of the soul. That's the beauty of art. ****************************** If you live outside the USA and would like to purchase a piece of artwork, please email me using the CONTACT PAGE.

Friday, 13 February 2009

He that gives good advice builds with one hand; he that gives good counsel and example builds with both.

Wednesday, 11 February 2009

1990

Shortlist:

  • N/A

Jury:

  • N/A

Turner Prize suspended

Quotes

‘Today’s the day, when all being well, a new Prize winner would have been announced. Instead silence.’

– Coverage on The Late Show broadcast, 1990

Art criticism is the discussion or evaluation of visual art.

Art critics usually criticize art in the context of aesthetics or the theory of beauty. One of criticism's goals is the pursuit of a rational basis for art appreciation.

The variety of artistic movements has resulted in a division of art criticism into different disciplines, each using vastly different criteria for their judgements. The most common division in the field of criticism is between historical criticism and evaluation, a form of art history, and contemporary criticism of work by living artists.

Despite perceptions that art criticism is a much lower risk activity than making art, opinions of current art are always liable to drastic corrections with the passage of time. Critics of the past are often ridiculed for either favoring artists now derided (like the academic painters of the late 19th Century) or dismissing artists now venerated (like the early work of the Impressionists). Some art movements themselves were named disparagingly by critics, with the name later adopted as a sort of badge of honor by the artists of the style (e.g. Impressionism, Cubism), the original negative meaning forgotten.

Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket (1874) by James McNeill Whistler

Some critics are unable to adapt to new movements in art and allow their opinions to override their objectivity, resulting in inappropriately dated critique. John Ruskin famously compared one of James McNeill Whistler's paintings, Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket, to "flinging a pot of paint in the public's face".

Artists have often had an uneasy relationship with their critics. Artists usually need positive opinions from critics for their work to be viewed and purchased; unfortunately for the artists, only later generations may understand it.

"Everybody must have projects all the time. The maximum must be extracted from leisure... The whole of life must look like a job, and by this resemblance conceal what is not yet directly devoted to pecuniary gain."
Don't be afraid of death so much as an inadequate life. ~ Bertolt Brecht

Bad Request

Error 400

Tuesday, 10 February 2009

Work
without
Hope
draws
nectar
in
a
sieve,
And
Hope without an object cannot live.

How deep is your love?

Can’t find the words? Let this selection of Valentine gifts do the talking. On sale now at the Pallant House Gallery Bookshop:

POP ART by Peter Blake

4 Enamel badges (36mm x 36mm each)
Boxed, signed and numbered
From an edition of 2,000
£50 + £10 P&P

Hand-printed valentine cards
By Brighton designer SORT designs
£2.50 each

‘This is for you’
Paper-cut artist book by Rob Ryan
£12

‘Little but often’
Book by Richard Price
Designed by Ronald King of Circle Press
Limited edition/signed copies
£60

Hand-carved gilded heart stones
Individually made by local stonemason, Jo Sweeting.
£25 each

Monday, 9 February 2009

Anhedonia

What is anhedonia?

Anhedonia is the inability to experience pleasure. A person who used to enjoy activities will find these are no longer enjoyable.

What does anhedonia feel like?

Anhedonia prevents feelings of happiness. Instead of happiness, the person feels nothing. Activities that used to excite, energize, calm or relax now offer no positive reward. Life seems boring, unenjoyable, and empty.

How can I recognize this symptom?

The person does not express interest in activities that they normally enjoy. The individual may not go on their daily walks, as they always enjoyed doing. Possibly, they may not answer the telephone. The individual may not go out with their friends for coffee, dinner, or pursue leisure activities. They may tell you they feel bored.

How does this bipolar disorder symptom impact life?

Exercise, socialization, or leisure activities usually provide pleasure and enjoyment. When the positive emotional rewards are absent, a person may have less motivation to pursue these activities.

The person becomes increasingly sedentary and isolative. A decrease in exercise, socialization, and leisure activities may worsen the symptoms of bipolar disorder.

A rough History of the days and uses of
the Society around the reading guided by the
Spectacle of Nietzsche reading images.





ll

RomeFrankfurtRioBarcelonaBrusselsNew York



(space)

"Perhaps in a haphazardly purile way, this might simply be about."

S


P

A

C

E

otcz

COMFORTZONE
"Outside the"
COMFORTZONE
Outside the

RR

SNOW
FOLLOWED BY
RAIN
FOLLOWED BY
CLOUD
FOLLOWED BY
SNOW

enough one

Romefrankfurtriobarcelonabrusselsnewyorkaustincopenhagenlondon
parisgenevanewyorkboulognesidneymilannewyorkmilanhoustonantwerp
londonleipziglondonnewyorkcaracasnewyorklondonparisdublinchicagoberlin
zurichlosangelesgent
New York
Berlin
London
Toronto
Mexico City
Leipzig
Boston
Sao Paulo
Brussels
Berlin
Milan
Los Angeles
New York
Berlin
Tokyo
Munich
London
London
Leipzig
Warsaw/Berlin
Milan
Paris
Chicago
Cologne
Belo Horizonte/ L.A.
New York
London
New York
San Antonio
Boston
New York
Cologne
Düsseldorf
Tel Aviv
London
Ljubljana
Prague
Murcia
New York
New York
Belgium
New York
Copenhagen
valenciafrankfurtchicago
Llwyd?

4 quartends

Making
no work
to do.

Making
know -work
to do

No work
To know
Making do

Making
to do
working, no

point, taken

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. (Twain)

Twenty minutes from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Thursday, 5 February 2009

Another

Since 1980, the subject and the medium of his work has been the brush stroke. Nares uses huge canvases or papers, on which he leaves the trail of his stroke, including some authentic splattering drops, with the swing of one movement. The oversized brushes he needs for this are made by himself, as well as the apparatus from which he suspends himself laying flat above the canvas.

His work is very spontanous, yet precise; there is no schedule that he follows. Sometimes he gets his perfect stroke on the first try, but usually he needs more repetitions to achieve the desired result, which might require a hundred or more tries. While it is true that each of his painting takes only a few seconds, they are repeated over hours and days. Immediately after the application of the paint, Nares decides if he is content with the result. If he isn’t, he wipes off the paint with a special squeegee, and tries again. To be able to use the canvases several times, he covers them with a smooth, grey primer.

In most cases, there is only one stroke per canvas or paper, which is usually and distinctly horizontal or vertical, but sometimes he combines similar strokes into groups, creating choreographic rhythms.

Nares’s work possesses a similarity to Asian calligraphy, as well as a reminiscence to Roy Lichtenstein’s famous brush stroke as a parody of the Abstract Expressionist gesture of the ’60s to dance, meditation and movement itself. But these are only a few of the most obvious associations a viewer gets by looking at his work.

James Nares was born in 1953 in London, but has lived and worked in New York since 1974.

As yet - unedited, but ready

Galerie presents the Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky's second
solo exhibition in Germany with selected works from the Australia series. Burtynsky's
large scale colour photographs document the many facets of nature as they are transformed
by human industry. Industrial processes such as gold- and silvermining are presented
as highly expressive visions where beauty is found in the most unlikely of places.
The images by Burtynsky (born 1955 in St. Catharines, Ontario) are metaphors of
the dilemma of our modern existence. We are drawn by the desire for prosperity and
a good comfortable life, yet we all know that the world suffers to meet those demands.
Our dependence on nature to provide us with the materials for our consumption, in
contrast to our concern for the health of our planet, sets us into the uneasy contradiction
that feeds the dialogue in Burtynsky's images between attraction and repulsion,
seduction and fear. This contradiction is absolutely intended, as the artist insists
that he is not celebrating nor condemning anything; neither industrialization nor
the impact of civilization on the environment. Edward Burtynsky shows exceptional
talent with his constant attention to composition and light, always presenting images
with a painter's eye for colour and a sculptor's feel of form.
Burtynsky's photographs are included in the collections of numerous major museums
around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim Museum in
New York, the National Gallery of Canada, the Biblioteque National in Paris, and
the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid. Edward Burtynsky is established as one of Canada's
most respected contemporary photographers. In June 2006, he was appointed to the
Order of Canada, Canada's highest civilian honour, recognizing lifetime achievement.

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a piece of writing called "AGAINST TRANSPORTATION"




SWANSEA:
THE
PARIS
OF ETERNITY
SWANSEA:
THE
PARIS
OF ETERNITY
SWANSEA:
THE
PARIS
OF ETERNITY
SWANSEA:
THE
PARIS
OF ETERNITY

lost scenarios

dD loses his pen a number of times In his life. Episodes ensue

plebiscite


/plebbisit/

noun 1 the direct vote of all the members of an electorate on an important public question. 2 (in ancient Rome) a law enacted by the plebeians’ assembly.

— DERIVATIVES plebiscitary /plebissitri/ adjective.

— ORIGIN French plébiscite, from Latin plebs ‘the common people’ + scitum ‘decree’.


REGINALD EDWARDS (Straight edge Redge)

"As Reg's coffin is lowered,
dD remarks that Reg was
now able to converse with
dead fascists and that he
now owned property -
his plot in the cemetry.
"

From: 'Prelude to the unpublished'

TONOT be

To be awake is to be alive. (Thoreau) To be alive is to not be asleep.

Chicago Sun Times




Wall,space

Paint Blago's portrait
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Former Gov. Rod Blagojevich was impeached before a portrait could be created and hanged in the state Capitol's Hall of Governors. Create a portrait of Blago and share it with us!
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Wednesday, 4 February 2009

Gatecrash

Someone has to die in order that the rest of us should value life more
(VW)
Someone has to die in order that the rest of us should value life less


Tuesday, 3 February 2009

Clerkenbakewell

The artist constructs optimal viewing areas for the presentation of video works. For this project The artist presented ‘exhibition/work title' which seeks to deal with the idea through experimental conventions and reference poetry. The piece reveals embedded fantasy and sexuality and functions as a topical monologue, a story and narrative. Also presented is 'untitled: painting’ (date). The artist returns in spirit, after recent shows. New works show ideas which refer to an absence of the signifier. The artist is based in a city and was recently part of the ‘exhibition title’ exhibitions. (date). For ‘exhibition title’ the artist has created a video which examines the darker side of the vortex. The artist graduated this summer from the School of Art and is now finishing a diploma. The artist's work questions the transformation of reality in mass produced imagery. The artist brings her intentional fakery for the first time. The artist is one of a group of sculptors including Artist 1, Artist 2 and Artist 3 who have built a reputation for flamboyant artworks. Whilst the work often suggests a vision of the underbelly, it remains captivating and humorous. The artist uses material to create art objects. Central to the practice is the categorisation of the medium by its formal qualities rather than subject or content. 'Exhibition title' was the latest in a series of collaborative site-specific projects using a wide variety of materials by The artist currently based in two cities.

Clerkenbakewell

The artist constructs optimal viewing areas for the presentation of video works. For this project The artist presented ‘exhibition/work title' which seeks to deal with the idea through experimental conventions and reference poetry. The piece reveals embedded fantasy and sexuality and functions as a topical monologue, a story and narrative. Also presented is 'untitled: painting’ (date). The artist returns in spirit, after recent shows. New works show ideas which refer to an absence of the signifier. The artist is based in a city and was recently part of the ‘exhibition title’ exhibitions. (date). For ‘exhibition title’ the artist has created a video which examines the darker side of the vortex. The artist graduated this summer from the School of Art and is now finishing a diploma. The artist's work questions the transformation of reality in mass produced imagery. The artist brings her intentional fakery for the first time. The artist is one of a group of sculptors including Artist 1, Artist 2 and Artist 3 who have built a reputation for flamboyant artworks. Whilst the work often suggests a vision of the underbelly, it remains captivating and humorous. The artist uses material to create art objects. Central to the practice is the categorisation of the medium by its formal qualities rather than subject or content. 'Exhibition title' was the latest in a series of collaborative site-specific projects using a wide variety of materials by The artist currently based in two cities.

The high priest speaks,